Yemen Military, Economy and Transportation

Yemen Military, Economy and Transportation

Economics

Economic Review: In Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Arab world, in the mid-1990s. powerful economic growth began, associated with an increase in oil production, but the decline in oil prices in 1998 caused damage to the country’s economy. Yemen has adopted an IMF-sponsored structural adjustment program designed to modernize and rationalize the economy, leading to a reduction and restructuring of external debt. Yemen is making efforts to maintain control over spending and implement other items of the IMF program, which was facilitated by the increase in oil prices in 1999-2000. The high population growth rate (3.4%) and internal political divisions make the task of the government more difficult.┬áSee topb2bwebsites.com to know more about Yemen in 2004.
GDP: at purchasing power parity – $14.4 billion (2000 est.).
Real GDP growth rate: 6% (2000 est.).
GDP per capita: at purchasing power parity – $820 (2000 est.).
The composition of GDP by sectors of the economy: agriculture: 20%; industry: 42%; services: 38% (1998).
Proportion of population below the poverty line: 19% (1992 est.).
Percentage distribution of family income or consumption: per 10% of the poorest families: 2.3%; by the top 10% of families: 30.8% (1992).
Inflation rate at consumer prices: 10% (2000 est.).
Labor force: no data.
Employment structure: the majority of the population is employed in agriculture and grazing or works abroad; less than a quarter of the active population is employed in services, construction, industry and trade.
Unemployment rate: 30% (1995 est.).
Budget: revenues: $3 billion; expenditures: $3.1 billion including capital expenditures – NA (2001 est.).
Spheres of economy: extraction of crude oil and oil refining; small-scale production of cotton fabrics and leather goods; food industry; handicraft production; a small factory for the production of aluminum products; cement production.
Growth in industrial production: no data available.
Electricity generation: 2.4 billion kWh (1999)
Sources of electricity generation: fossil fuel: 100%; hydropower: 0%; nuclear fuel: 0%; others: 0% (1999).
Electricity consumption: 2.232 billion kWh (1999)
Electricity export: 0 kWh (1999).
Electricity import: 0 kWh (1999).
Agricultural products: grain, fruits, vegetables, khat (soft drug), coffee, cotton; dairy products, livestock, poultry, beef; fish.
Exports: $4.2 billion (free on board, 2000 est.)
Exports: crude oil, coffee, dried and salted fish.
Export partners: Thailand 34%, China 26%, South Korea 14%, Japan 3% (1999).
Imports: $2.7 billion (free on board, 2000 est.)
Import articles: food and live animals, machinery and equipment.
Import partners: Saudi Arabia 10%, US 7%, UAE 8%, France 7%, Italy 6% (1999).
External debt: $4.4 billion (2000) Economic aid recipient: $176.1 million (1995)
Economic aid donor:
Currency: Yemeni rial.
Currency code: YER.
Exchange rate: YER/USD – 164.590 (October 2000), 160.683 (2000), 155.718 (1999), 135.882 (1998), 129.281 (1997), 94.157 (1996).
Fiscal year: calendar year.

Telecommunications

Telecommunications Telephone lines: 291 359 (1999).
Mobile cellular telephones: 32,042 (2000).
Telephone system: after the unification of the country in 1990, steps were taken to create a nationwide telecommunications network; domestic: the network includes microwave radio relay, cable, tropospheric scatter and GSM cellular mobile communications; international: satellite earth stations – 3 Intelsat (2 Indian and 1 Atlantic oceans), 1 Intersputnik (Atlantic Ocean region) and 2 Arabsat; microwave radio relay to Saudi Arabia and Djibouti.
Broadcast stations: AM – 6, FM – 1, shortwave – 2 (1998).
Radio receivers: 1.05 million (1997)
TV Broadcast Stations: 7 (and a few low power repeaters) (1997).
TVs: 470,000 (1,997).
Internet country code: ye
Internet service providers: 1 (2000).
Number of users: 12,000 (2000).

Transport

Transport Railways: 0 km.
Roads: total: 69,263 km; coated: 9,963 km; unpaved: 59,300 km (1999)
Pipelines: for crude oil – 644 km; for oil products – 32 km.
Ports and harbors: Aden, As-Salif (As Salif), Mocha, Nishtun (Nishtun), Hodeida, Al-Mukalla.
Merchant fleet: total: 4 vessels (displacement 1,000 tons or more) with a total displacement of 15,075 gross register tons / 23,562 long tons of gross tonnage; different types of ships: cargo ships – 1, oil tankers – 3 (2000 est.).
Airports: 50 (2000 est.).
Airports with paved runways: total: 13; over 3,047 m: 2; from 2438 to 3047 m: 8; from 1524 to 2437 m:1; from 914 to 1523 m:1; less than 914 m: 1 (2000 est.).
Airports with unpaved runways: total: 37; over 3,047 m: 2; from 2438 to 3047 m:9; from 1,524 to 2,437 m: 8; from 914 to 1523 m: 13; less than 914 m: 5 (2000 est.).

Armed forces

Branches of the armed forces: ground forces, navy, air force, air defense forces, presidential guard, paramilitaries (including police).
Enlistment age: 14 years old.
Total Military Manpower: Male 15 to 49: 4,103,093 (2001 est.).
Eligible for military service: men 15 to 49 pets: 2,303,257 (2001 est.).
Number of persons reaching military age each year: male: 238,690 (2001 est.).
Military spending in dollar terms: $414 million (1999)
Military spending as part of GDP: 7.6% (1999).

International Issues

International Issues International Disputes: In June 2000, a border delimitation treaty was concluded with Saudi Arabia, but final demarcation requires tribal agreements.

Yemen Military