State Route 140 and 159 in Nevada

State Route 140 and 159 in Nevada

State Route 140 in Nevada

SR-140
Get started Winnemucca
End Oregon state line
Length 110 mi
Length 177 km
Route
Denio

Oregon

State Route 140 is a state route in the U.S. state of Nevada. The road forms a long and lonely east-west route in the northwest part of the state. There is no place on the 177-mile route, but the road begins north of Winnemucca and ends at the Oregon border. It is the second longest state route in Nevada.

Travel directions

State Route 140 at the Oregon border.

State Route 140 is located entirely in Humboldt County. The road turns off US 95 50 kilometers north of Winnemucca and then heads west. The road leads through a very remote area, the only place near the road is Denio, which has 50 inhabitants. The landscape is barren and desolate, with wide valleys interspersed with mountain ranges. The road varies in altitude from 1,200 to 1,800 meters above sea level, but has no real mountain passes. On the western part of the route, the road leads through a spectacular, but inaccessible canyon. The landscape also has several mesas, steep mountain ridges with a flattened top. In uninhabited areas one reaches the Oregon state border, after which State Route 140 in Oregon continues to Lakeview.

  • ANSWERMBA: Provides information about Nevada history and geography.

History

Already in the 1920s there was a connection from Winnemucca to Denio that more or less followed the current route. This was not a real road, but a track through the desolate landscape. From Denio there was also a connection westwards, more this ran not to Oregon, but further south to California. This road was later renumbered as State Route 8A. This one ran to Alturas in California.

In 1940, the section between US 95 and Denio was upgraded to a gravel road. Around 1948 the first part was paved, from US 95 westwards but did not reach far westwards. In 1949 the first part west of Denio became a gravel road, not much more than 15 kilometers. In 1952 the asphalted part was extended quite a bit to near Denio and in 1954 the asphalt road to Denio was completed. With this, the eastern half of later State Route 140 was completely paved, but west of Denio the road was still an unimproved dirt road and still headed toward Alturas instead of Oregon.

In the 1950s, a movement emerged to create a better connection between northwestern Nevada and southern Oregon, which became the ‘Winnemucca to the Sea Highway’. At the time, US 95 was the only thoroughfare between the two states. The road was eventually built in a short time in 1959-1960 as an asphalt road over the current route, creating the road in its current form.

In 1968 the road was renumbered from State Route 8A to State Route 140, at the time it was seen as a branch of US 40, which was later dropped from Nevada. This made State Route 140 one of the few state routes that received its current number before the major renumbering of 1976. However, there were plans at the time to number the road as State Route 291, but that has not been implemented.

Traffic intensities

Every day, 250 vehicles travel between US 95 and Denio and 200 vehicles between Denio and the Oregon border. This makes State Route 140 extremely light.

State Route 159 in Nevada

SR-159
Get started Blue Diamond
End Las Vegas
Length 31 mi
Length 50 km
Route
Blue DiamondSummerlin South

Las Vegas

State Route 159 is a state route in the U.S. state of Nevada. The road forms a hook through the Las Vegas metropolitan area and is 50 kilometers long.

Travel directions

State Route 159 through the Red Rock Canyon.

Near the village of Blue Diamond, State Route 159 branches off from State Route 160 and first curves along the base of the Spring Mountains west of Las Vegas. This section follows a scenic route, where the road curves east and then runs west to east on Charleston Boulevard across Las Vegas. Charleston Boulevard is a major urban arterial with mostly 2×3 lanes and numerous traffic lights. The road has connections to Interstate 15, Interstate 215, and Interstate 515. The road runs between downtown Las Vegas and the Las Vegas Strip, ending in the east of the city at State Route 612.

History

Charleston Boulevard in Las Vegas was originally numbered as an alternate route from US 95 for some time. It has historically been one of the major urban thoroughfares of the Las Vegas region. In 1995, the western portion of the Red Rock Canyon was marked as a scenic byway.

Traffic intensities

The road in Las Vegas handles mostly 30,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day, with a peak of 70,000 vehicles connecting to I-515 and 80,000 vehicles connecting to I-15.

State Route 159 in Nevada