Saskatchewan, Canada

Saskatchewan, Canada

Overview

According to topschoolsintheusa, where the name Saskatchewan comes from is a matter of debate; possibly deriving from the Cree Indian term Kisisskatchewan, which means “fast-flowing river”. In fact, the Canadian province is made up of nearly 100,000 lakes and rivers and is quite diverse in terms of landscape, although it is widely believed that Saskatchewan is just one vast prairie. The vast, treeless plains of southern Saskatchewan are broken up by river valleys and low-lying mountain ranges. In the north lie great forests, and the two national parks – Prince Albert National Park to the north and Grasslands National Park to the southwest – cover almost 2 million hectares. The rural province has few permanent cities and many northern regions are accessible only by air. In the pleasant seclusion of Saskatchewan, life is easygoing. Although there are adventures and rodeos to be found here, the best way to visit Saskatchewan is to enjoy the great outdoors and its people. Wolves, moose and caribou live in the northern forests, while elk and deer can be found further south. The rural province has few permanent cities, and many northern regions are only accessible by air. In the pleasant seclusion of Saskatchewan, life is easygoing. Although there are adventures and rodeos to be found here, the best way to visit Saskatchewan is to enjoy the great outdoors and its people. Wolves, moose and caribou live in the northern forests, while elk and deer can be found further south. The rural province has few permanent cities, and many northern regions are only accessible by air. In the pleasant seclusion of Saskatchewan, life is easygoing. Although there are adventures and rodeos to be found here, the best way to visit Saskatchewan is to enjoy the great outdoors and its people. Wolves, moose and caribou live in the northern forests, while elk and deer can be found further south. Although there are adventures and rodeos to be found here, the best way to visit Saskatchewan is to enjoy the great outdoors and its people. Wolves, moose and caribou live in the northern forests, while elk and deer can be found further south. Although there are adventures and rodeos to be found here, the best way to visit Saskatchewan is to enjoy the great outdoors and its people. Wolves, moose and caribou live in the northern forests, while elk and deer can be found further south.

Getting there

Arriving by plane

There are no direct flights to Saskatchewan from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Air Canada (AC) offers scheduled flights to Saskatoon and Regina with stopovers in Calgary and Toronto, among others. WestJet (WS), Transwest Air and Prairie Flying Service are the primary regional air services within the province, including connections to major Canadian cities and northern parks and lakes.

Flight times

Frankfurt/M. – Saskatoon: 10 hrs 40 mins; Zurich – Saskatoon: 13 hrs 15 mins; Vienna – Saskatoon: 13 hours 35 minutes (each pure flight time). Toronto – Saskatoon: 3 hours 35 minutes; Calgary – Saskatoon: 1 hr 10 min; Toronto – Regina: 3 hrs 20 mins; Calgary – Regina: 1 hr 20 min

Arrival by car

Several highways run through the state: – East-West: the Northern Woods Route, the Water Route (9 and 55), the Yellowhead Highway (16), the Trans-Canada Highway (1) and the Red Coat Trail (13), – in a north-south direction: the CanAm International Highway and the Saskota International Highway (9). The northern half of the province has little access to highways; many communities, camping/hunting and fishing areas are only accessible by plane at all. Bus: Engelheim Tours offer bus tours of Saskatchewan (including prairie and casino tours). Coaches can also be hired in larger cities. Rental cars are available in most cities in the state. Seat belts are compulsory for all vehicle occupants. Toll: There are no toll roads in Saskatchewan. Documents: The German national driving license is valid for 6 months in Canada. However, it is recommended that you carry your international driver’s license with you. All other nationalities require the International Driving Permit.

Arrival by train

VIA Rail trains traverse Saskatchewan on the Winnipeg, Manitoba – Saskatoon – Edmonton, Alberta line.

rail passes

The Canrailpass and Canrailpass – Corridor are also valid in Saskatchewan. For more information on Rail Passes, contact Via Rail Canada or CRD, or see Canada – Local Mobility.

Arrival by ship

Saskatchewan has no coast.

Ferry provider

Ferries crossing rivers within the province are state-operated and, with the exception of the Wollaston ferry, are free. They usually operate from mid-April to mid-November, depending on weather and ice conditions. The Saskatchewan government provides detailed information on its website.

Routes across the rivers

Ferries on the Saskatchewan River connect the state to Manitoba and Alberta; Ferries to Manitoba also operate on the Churchill River. Houseboats can also be rented.

Passport and visa regulations

Entry with children

Since June 27, 2012, children need their own travel document (passport / children’s passport) for trips abroad (also within the EU). Entries of children in the parental passport are no longer possible.

Language

Overview

Mainly English.

Public Holidays

Overview

As in the rest of Canada, plus:

Contact addresses

Tourism Regina
1925 Rose Street
Regina, Saskatchewan
Canada
+1 (306) 789.50.99, toll free in Canada: (800) 661.50.99.
http://www.tourismregina.com
http://www.tourismregina.com Tourism Saskatoon
101-202 Fourth Avenue North
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Canada
+1 (306) 242.12.06 or +1 (800) 567.24.44 (toll free in Canada/USA)
http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com
http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com Tourism Saskatchewan
Albert Street 189-1621
Regina, Saskatchewan
Canada
+1 (306) 787.96.00 or +1 (877) 237.22.73 (toll free in Canada).
http://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com
http://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com

Mon – Fri: 08:00 – 17:00

Business

Business contacts

Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce 1630 Chateau Tower, 1920 Broad Street, Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V2 Tel: (306) 352 26 71 Fax: (306) 781 70 84 E-mail: info@saskchamber.com Internet: www .saskchamber.comSaskatchewan Industry and Resources300-2103-11th Avenue, Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3Z8 Tel: (306) 787 47 65. Fax: (306) 787 84 47. Internet: www.ir.gov.sk.ca

Attractions

Regina

The city center of the provincial capital Regina forms the Wascana Center, a park area with the Saskatchewan Science Center, the Mackenzie Art Gallery and the Conexus Art Center, among others. Also in the park are the Houses of Parliament, the Royal Saskatchewan Museum of Natural History and other museums. Regina has long been the headquarters of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the “Mounties”), and their “Sunset Parade” is well worth seeing. The RCMP Heritage Center provides an insight into the history of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Saskatoon

Saskatoon on the South Saskatchewan River was one of Canada’s boom cities. The river banks consist of beautiful parkland and recreational areas. The Western Development Museum takes visitors back to when Saskatoon was boomtown in 1910, the Wanuskewin Heritage Park has rotating exhibits about indigenous culture, the Forestry Farm Park & ​​Zoo features local and exotic animals, the Ukrainian Museum of Canada and the Art Museum Remai Modern are the most famous sights.

Shopping

Overview

Earthenware, tie-dye, stone jewelry, watches, stamped leather, denim apparel, gloves and hats.

Nightlife

Introduction

There are a few nightclubs and there are live performances in bars and restaurants in the larger towns. Nightlife is at its liveliest during the period when historical festivals are held in all major cities.

Culinary

Overview

Specialties are whitefish and young pike, which are sold by Indian cooperatives. Harvested by Native Americans, the wild rice is a delicious accompaniment to wild fowl such as wild goose, wild duck, prairie chicken and partridge. Resembling blueberries, Saskatoons are made into jam, jelly and tarts served with fresh cream. There are also cranberries and pinchberries, which are made into a refreshing jelly. Beverages: Must be 19 or older to purchase alcohol. Liquor is sold in licensed stores, restaurants, cocktail lounges and inns. Liquor stores are everywhere.

Accommodation

Hotels

Most of the housing is concentrated in the south of the province, primarily in Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw and Weyburn. The parks in the north are mostly campgrounds. Houseboats are very popular on Saskatchewan’s lakes. The hotel association can be contacted at the following address: Hotel Association of Saskatchewan, 302-2080 Broad Street, Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 1Y3. (Tel: (306) 522 1664. Internet: www.hotelsofsask.com). Categories: The annual The Saskatchewan Accommodation, Resort and Campground Guide lists all hotels, motels, farm stays and inns.

Camping

The parks are home to some of Canada’s best campgrounds. The parks – 25 provincial, 2 national and 101 regional parks – have different offers for travelers without a tent or caravan. Further information from the local park authorities. Some companies rent fully equipped campers. For more information, contact Saskatchewan Tourism (see addresses).

Climate

Best travel time

Temperate climate in the south, cold winters in the north. Hot and dry in summer with plenty of sunshine, in winter temperatures often fall below freezing. April to June are the rainiest.

Country data

Area (sq km)

651036

Population

1,190,657

Population density (per square km)

2

Population statistics year

2019

Saskatchewan, Canada