Guatemala Military, Economy and Transportation

Guatemala Military, Economy and Transportation

Economy

Economy overview: The agricultural sector produces a quarter of GDP, provides two thirds of exports and provides half of the jobs. Coffee, sugar, bananas are its main products. Former president of ARSU (ARZU) (1996-2000) implemented a program of economic liberalization and political reforms. The signing of the peace agreement in December 1996, which ended the 36-year civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment. In 1998, Hurricane Mitch caused little damage to Guatemala compared to its neighbors. Today’s urgent tasks are to increase government revenues, conduct negotiations on receiving assistance from international donors, increase the efficiency and openness of both public and private financial transactions. Despite low international prices for Guatemala’s main products, economic growth was 3% in 2000 and is projected to grow by 4% in 2001. Guatemala, along with Honduras and El Salvador, recently concluded a free trade agreement with Mexico and has taken steps to protect investor property rights . However, the PORTILLO administration revised the results of the privatization carried out by the previous government, thereby somewhat worrying investors. See cheeroutdoor.com to know more about Guatemala Business.
GDP: at purchasing power parity – $46.2 billion (2000 est.).
Real GDP growth rate: 3% (2000 est.).
GDP per capita: at purchasing power parity – $3,700 (2000 est.).
The composition of GDP by sectors of the economy: agriculture: 23%; industry: 20%; services: 57% (2000 est.).
Proportion of population below the poverty line: 60%.
Percentage distribution of family income or consumption: 10% of the poorest families account for: 0.6%; 10% of the wealthiest families account for: 46.6% (1989).
Inflation rate at consumer prices: 6% (2000 est.).
Labor force: 4.2 million people (1999 est.).
Employment structure: agriculture 50%, industry 15%, services 35% (1999 est.).
Unemployment rate: 7.5% (1999 est.).
Budget: revenues: $2.2 billion; expenditures: $1.8 billion, including capital expenditures – NA (2001 est.).
Spheres of economy: production of sugar, textiles and clothing, furniture, chemicals, oil industry, metallurgy, rubber production, tourism.
Growth in industrial production: 4.1% (1999).
Electricity generation: 3.785 billion kWh (1999)
Sources of electricity generation: fossil fuels: 38.31%; hydropower: 61.69%; nuclear fuel: 0%; others: 6.97% (1999).
Electricity consumption: 3.295 billion kWh (1999)
Electricity export: 435 million kWh (1999).
Electricity import: 210 million kWh (1999).
Agricultural products: sugar cane, corn, bananas, coffee, legumes, cardamom; cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens.
Export: $2.9 billion (free on board, 2000)
Exports: coffee, sugar, bananas, fruits and vegetables, meat, clothing, oil, electricity.
Export partners: USA 51.4%, El Salvador 8.7%, Honduras 5%, Costa Rica 3.44%, Germany 2.7% (1998).
Imports: $4.4 billion (free on board, 2000)
Imports: fuel, machinery and transport equipment, building materials, grain, fertilizers, electricity.
Import partners: US 42.8%, Mexico 9.9%, Japan 4.8%, El Salvador 4.3%, Venezuela 3.8% (1998).
External debt: $4.7 billion (2000 est.) Economic aid recipient: $212 million (1995)
Economic aid donor:
Currency: quetzal, US dollar, others allowed.
Currency code: GTQ; USD.
Exchange rate: GTQ/USD – 7.8020 (January 2001), 7.7632 (2000), 7.3856 (1999), 6.3947 (1998), 6.0653 (1997), 6.0495 (1996).
Fiscal year: calendar year.

Telecommunications

Telecommunications Telephone lines: 665 061 (June 2000).
Mobile cellular phones: 663,296 (September 2000).
Telephone system: fairly modern network in cities; internal: no data; international: attached to the Central American microwave system; ground satellite station – 1 Intepsat (Atlantic Ocean).
Broadcast stations: AM – 130, FM – 487, shortwave – 15 (2000).
Radio receivers: 835,000 (1997).
Television broadcast stations: 26 (and 27 repeaters) (1997).
Televisions: 1.323 million (1997)
Internet Country Code: gt
Internet Service Providers: 5 (2000).
Number of users: 65,000 (2000).

Transport

Transport Railways: total: 884 km (102 km privately owned); narrow gauge: 884 km (0.914 m gauge, single track).
Roads: total: 13,856 km; paved: 4,370 km (including 140 km of highways); unpaved: 9,486 km (1998 est.)
Waterways: 990 km; note -260 km are navigable all year round, 730 km are navigable during the high water season.
Pipelines: for crude oil – 275 km.
Ports and harbours: Puerto Barrios, Puerto Quet-sal, Santo Tomas de Castilla, San José, Champerico.
Merchant fleet: none (2000 est.).
Airports: 477 (2000 est.).
Airports with paved runways: total: 11; from 2438 to 3047 m:3; from 1524 to 2437 m:1; from 914 to 1523 m:5; less than 914 m: 2 (2000 est.).
Airports with unpaved runways: total: 466; from 2438 to 3047 m:1; from 1524 to 2437 m:9; from 914 to 1523 m:124; less than 914 m: 332 (2000 est.).

Armed Forces

Branches of the Armed Forces: Army, Navy, Air Force.
Enlistment age: 18 years old.
Total Military Manpower: Male 15 to 49: 3,092,050 (2001 est.).
Eligible for military service: males aged 15 to 49: 2,018,636 (2001 est.).
Number of persons reaching military age each year: male: 140,358 (2001 est.).
Military spending in dollar terms: $120 million (1999)
Military spending as part of GDP: 0.6% (1999).

Guatemala Military