Afghanistan Military, Economy and Transportation

Afghanistan Military, Economy and Transportation

Economics

Economy overview: Afghanistan is an exceptionally poor, landlocked country heavily dependent on agricultural and livestock products (sheep and goats). Economic considerations played a secondary role compared to the political and military situation of the last two decades, including almost 10 years of Soviet armed occupation (ended February 15, 1989). During this conflict, one third of the population left the country, more than 6 million people took refuge in Pakistan and Iran. By the beginning of 1999, 2 million refugees remained in Pakistan and 1.4 million in Iran. Gross domestic product has declined significantly in the last 20 years due to the loss of labor and capital, as well as the disruption of trade and transport links; severe droughts 1998-2000 made the situation even more difficult. The majority of the population continues to lack food, clothing, housing and medical care. Inflation remains a serious problem for the whole country. International assistance can only be directed at solving humanitarian problems; stimulating economic development lies outside its scope. In 1999-2000 the economic situation did not improve as the civil war continued, hindering domestic economic policy and international aid. Statistics are unavailable or unreliable. In 1999, Afghanistan was the largest producer of opium poppy, and the drug trade is the main source of income. the economic situation did not improve as the civil war continued, hindering domestic economic policy and international aid. Statistics are unavailable or unreliable. In 1999, Afghanistan was the largest producer of opium poppy, and the drug trade is the main source of income. the economic situation did not improve as the civil war continued, hindering domestic economic policy and international aid. Statistics are unavailable or unreliable. In 1999, Afghanistan was the largest producer of opium poppy, and the drug trade is the main source of income. See businesscarriers.com to know more about Afghanistan Economics and Business.
GDP: Purchasing Power Parity $21 billion (2000 est.)
Real GDP growth rate: no data available.
GDP per capita: Purchasing Power Parity $800 (2000 est.).
The composition of GDP by sectors of the economy: agriculture: 53%; industry: 28.5%; service industry: 18.5% (1990).
Proportion of the population below the poverty line: no data available.
Percentage distribution of household income or consumption: for the poorest 10% of households: n/a; by top 10% of households: no data.
Inflation rate at consumer prices: no data.
Labor force: 10 million people (2000 est.).
Employment structure: agriculture 70%, industry 15%, services 15% (1990 est.).
Unemployment rate: 8% (1995 est.).
Budget: income: no data; costs: no data; including capital investments – no data.
Spheres of economy: small-scale production of textiles, soap making, production of furniture, footwear, fertilizers, cement; hand-made carpets; extraction of natural gas, oil, coal, copper.
Growth in industrial production:
Electricity generation: 420 million kWh (1998).
Sources of electricity generation: fossil fuels: 35.71%; hydropower: 64.29%; nuclear fuel: 0%; others: 0% (1999).
Electricity consumption: 480.6 million kWh (1999)
Electricity export: 0 kWh (1999).
Electricity import: 90 million kWh (1999).
Agricultural products: opium poppy, wheat, fruits, nuts; wool, lamb, astrakhan.
Export: $80 million (excluding opium) (1996 est.)
Exports: opium, fruits and nuts, handmade carpets, wool, cotton, leather and hides, precious and semi-precious stones.
Export partners: countries of the former USSR, Pakistan, Iran, Germany, India, Great Britain, Belgium, Luxembourg, Czech Republic.
Imports: $150 million (1996 est.)
Import articles: means of production, foodstuffs and oil products; most consumer products.
Import partners: countries of the former USSR, Pakistan, Iran, Japan, Singapore, India, South Korea, Germany.
External debt: $5.5 billion (1996 est.) Economic Assistance Recipient: In 1997, the US provided about $70 million in humanitarian aid; The United States continues to provide comprehensive support for the implementation of UN programs for food aid, immunization, mine clearance, and large-scale assistance to refugees and displaced persons.
Economic aid donor:
Currency: Afghani.
Currency code: AFA.
Exchange rate: AFA/USD – 4,700 (January 2000), 4,750 (February 1999), 17,000 (December 1996), 7,000 (January 1995), 1,900 (January 1994), 1,019 (March 1993), 850 (1991) ; note – these rates are free market exchange rates and not the official rate, which was 50.600 afghani to the dollar until 1996, then rose to 2,262.65 to the dollar, and in April 1996 was fixed at around 3,000 afghani to the dollar.
Fiscal year: March 21 – March 20.

Telecommunications

Telecommunications Telephone lines: 29,000 (1996); note – there were 21,000 main lines in Kabul in 1998.
Mobile cellular phones: no data available.
Telephone system: domestic: very limited telephone and telegraph service; in 1997, communication was established between Mazar-i-Sharif, Herat, Kandahar, Jalalabad and Kabul via satellite and microwave systems; international: satellite ground stations – 1 Intelsat station (in the Indian Ocean), providing communication only with Iran, and 1 Intersputnik station (Atlantic Ocean region); commercial satellite call center in Ghazni.
Broadcast stations: AM -7 (6 of them do not operate; the current station is in Kabul), FM -1, shortwave -1 (broadcast in Pashto, Dari, Urdu and English) (1999).
Radio receivers: 167,000 (1999).
Television broadcast stations: at least 10 (one government central television station in Kabul and regional stations in nine out of 30 provinces; regional stations operate limited hours; in 1997 there was also a station in Mazar-e-Sharif broadcasting to four northern provinces of Afghanistan ) (1998).
TVs: 100,000 (1999).
Internet country code: af
Internet providers: 1.
Number of users: not available.

Transport

Transport Railways: total: 24.6 km; with broad gauge: 9.6 km (1.524 m gauge) from Kushka (Turkmenistan) to Torgundi; 15 km (1.524 m gauge) from Termez (Uzbekistan) to Hairatan, a border checkpoint on the southern bank of the Amu Darya.
Roads: total: 21,000 km; coated: 2,793 km; unpaved: 18,207 km (1998 est.)
Waterways: 1,200 km; mainly the Amu Darya, which can be traversed by ships with a displacement of up to about 500 long tons of full load capacity.
Pipelines: for oil products – from Uzbekistan to Bagram and from Turkmenistan to Shindand; for natural gas -180 km.
Ports and harbours: Hairaton, Sherkhan (Kyzylkala).
Airports: 45 (1999 est.).
Airports with paved runways: total: 10; over 3,047 m: 3; from 2438 to 3047 m: 4; from 1,524 to 2,437 m: 2; less than 914 m: 1 (2000 est.).
Airports with unpaved runways: total: 35; from 2438 TO 3047 m:4; from 1,524 to 2,437 m: 15; from 914 to 1523 m:4; less than 914 m: 12 (2000 est.). Helipads: 3 (2000 est.).

Armed Forces

Branches of the armed forces: no data; note – there are no nationwide armed vultures; some parts of the former land vultures, air force and air defense forces, the National Guard, the border troops, the national police (Sarandoi) and tribal militias still remain, but they are part of various factions.
Enlistment age: 22 years old.
Total Military Manpower: Male 15 to 49: 6,645,023 (2001 est.).
Eligible for military service: males aged 15 to 49: 3,561,957 (2001 est.).
Number of persons reaching military age each year: male: 252,869 (2001 est.).
Military spending in dollar terms: no data available.
Military spending as part of GDP: no data available.

International Issues

International issues International controversy: Some groups support Islamic militants around the world.
Illicit drugs: World’s largest opium producer, overtaking Myanmar (1999 possible production 1,670 metric tons; 1999 cultivated area 51,500 hectares, 23% more than 1998); a major supplier of hashish; there is a growing number of heroin laboratories in the country; the main political factions in the country derive their income from the drug trade.

Afghanistan Military